Ride with Respect

As a cyclist, we will usually be the fastest mover on shared paths and trails that are not always (ever?) designed for high speed and so we need to be mindful of others and make sure that everyone can enjoy their outing safely and happily.

Not all pedestrians will be as predictable as this little girl!

Not all pedestrians will be as predictable as this little girl!

Following a few simple rules will benefit everyone who uses these share resources.

Respect Others

  • Give way to pedestrians, wheelchair and other cyclists.
  • Be courteous and patient with pedestrians and other path users who are moving more slowly than you – shared paths are for sharing, not speeding.
  • Cycle at a safe and sensible speed. Do not use the trails for attempting a personal best time!
  • Slow down and leave plenty of room when passing horse-riders or people with dogs, especially when approaching from behind.
  • Slow down when the trail is busy or when you cannot see clearly ahead.
  • Slow down (or stop) at road junctions, sharp bends, entrances onto the path, or any other ‘blind spots’ where people (including children) could appear in front of you without warning.
  • If there is one, keep to your side of any dividing line, otherwise keep to the left as far as is safe for you.
  • Use you bell or call out an audible greeting when passing, to avoid surprising people or horse-riders.
  • Having given a warning, don’t assume people can see or hear you. People may be visually impaired, hard of hearing, distracted by other walkers or be wearing earphones.
  • In dull and dark weather turn on your front and rear lights to improve your visibility.

Respect The Trail

  • Respect land management activities such as farming or forestry.
  • Carry any litter with you until you can put it in a bin, or take it home.
  • Do not modify trails, damage signage or create new trails.
  • Do not pick flowers, foliage or damage the flora.
  • If camping, leave your campsite how you found it.

Respect Yourself

  • Always wear a helmet.
  • Consider bright or conspicuous clothing so that you are clearly visible to other trail users and motorists.
  • Keep your bike well maintained and roadworthy.
  • Be self-sufficient – in remote areas carry food, repair kit, map and waterproofs.
  • Cycle within your capabilities and always have a back-out plan.
  • Match your speed to the surface and your skills.
  • Look out for maintenance vehicles on tracks.